On the importance of endings, and why you need to get them right

turning off the tv

An ending needs to offer closure, a resolution to the plot threads, themes and ideas you’ve introduced over the years. If style is simply the mistakes you never stop making, this is the time to embrace those mistakes: remind them why they loved the story, and go out on a high.  If ever there’s a time to be self-indulgent, this is it – refer back to the old favourites and the recent successes, reflect on the first time you got something properly right, but don’t forget the best of your recent episodes. Normally it’s best to ignore the fans, but after all the support they’ve offered to you, it’s worth looking back on all the ones they liked over the years. Throw in a reference or two to the spinoff series your show might have borne – they’re continuing without you, even if they might not be quite the same anymore.

So, here’s a post that has nothing to do with anything really.

Ostensibly, it’s about the endings of television programmes and such, but it is in fact about the conclusion of my weekly Yahoo column, which came to an end after almost three years because of budget cuts. Which is, you know, fair enough, can’t argue with that (and I’m still going to make the occasional freelance contribution anyway, which perhaps undercuts the above more than a little bit).

It was a clever idea, although also very self-indulgent one, and it probably could’ve made for a much better post if I was a better writer than I actually am. At the moment it’s just a bit naff, but arguably maybe a little funny I guess.

Not a bad note to end on though really.

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What does Brexit mean for the TV and Film industry?

brexit uk tv film industry effect impact result leave eu mean affect europe funding grant

EU funding has been important to other ventures too, of course; notable movies in recent years that have received, and been dependent on, funding from Europe included Thatcher biopic The Iron Lady (€1.5m), Danny Boyle’s Slumdog Millionaire (€1.3m), and historical movie The King’s Speech (€1m). In terms of television, the EU’s Media Desk provided funding for Sky’s The Last Panthers, as well as Hinterland, Shaun the Sheep, and Inside Obama’s White House for the BBC.

The Olswang Media Group – an international law firm renowned for their experience and expertise in the area of technology, media and telecoms – commissioned an independent report on the impact of Brexit, which can be read in full here. It highlights the potential damage done by restricting free movement of industry professionals, the likelihood of losing important subsidies and support, as well as the general uncertainty which will afflict the industry for a long time to come. 

New Yahoo article from me, on Brexit, and its effect on the TV and film industry. As with a lot of industries following this vote, it’s in a pretty precarious position.

Gotta admit, I am very worried about this vote; it genuinely seems that the country has been co-opted by a very specific, and a very ugly, set of ideologies. This is not a future I ever would have hoped for, or ever wanted to live in.

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