Moon Knight can be Marvel Netflix’s answer to Legion

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Moon Knight is often criticised as being an “ersatz Batman”, which gives you some idea of the more surface level attributes of the character, but in fact it’s rather more complicated than that; a character who maintains a series of different personas (Moon Knight, Marc Spector, Steven Grant, Jake Lockley, etc) to help him fight crime, Moon Knight is a superhero with a dissociative identity disorder.

On one level, there’s scope to maintain much of what made the Marvel Netflix shows distinct in their own right, as part of the watershed moment that Daredevil once represented; Moon Knight’s mercenary past, his focus on vengeance and dealing with street crime allow for the same brutal physicality that has characterised the Netflix shows so far. And yet by the same stroke, the dissociative identity disorder inherent to the character would allow the show to play in the same sandbox as Legion, dealing with a deeper psychological drama and playing with the narrative in such a way we’ve never seen before. Indeed, a blend of these two approaches – the gritty realism and the subversive psychology – could help a prospective Moon Knight programme stand in its own right.

I wrote a post about Moon Knight, Legion, and what the next step forward is for Marvel Netflix.

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Legion is exactly what the superhero genre needs right now

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Legion’s first episode is, to put it lightly, a masterpiece. Noah Hawley provides an intricately written yet deeply poignant script; it begins with an unreliable narrator, but peels back the layers of perception to reveal a touching love story between the two leads, David (Dan Stevens) and Syd (Rachel Keller). Both actors give nuanced, powerful performances, elevating the already fantastic script ever higher as a result; it’s an engaging realisation of a complex script, making the spine of the character drama universal, despite how surreal everything surrounding it is.

Visually speaking, too, the show is a real departure from the norm. It’s beautifully directed, with very high production values and some stunning design work; in many ways, Legion feels like a work of art. There’s a gorgeous aesthetic carried throughout, from the cinematography to the colour palette, which makes just the sheer look of the show quite memorable in and of itself. Further, though, it feels like Legion’s aesthetic grows from its themes; the programme is grounded in uncertainty, and every visual detail contributes to this, creating a sense of holistic unity that sets Legion apart from the homogeneity of other superhero shows.

You guys, wow. Legion is phenomenal, and you should all be watching it.

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Everything you need to know about Legion – the new Marvel TV show that’s going to change the superhero game completely

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Legion is aiming to offer something different – in a media landscape with a deluge of superhero shows and comic book content, sometimes telling your Arrow from your Agents of SHIELD can get a little too much.

It’s why people keep on talking about ‘superhero fatigue’ – after a while, everything starts to feel a little same-y.

Here is a programme quite unlike one we’ve ever seen before – from a visionary director and writer, who’s more than proved his chops on Fargo.

When you’re offered the chance to watch something like this, something that’s set to flip the whole superhero paradigm on its head – well, why wouldn’t you give it a go?

Another new post from me, all about Legion – a new X-Men TV show that I’m really looking forward to.

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