These 10 actors would be perfect as the next Doctor Who

doctor who ten actors who could be the next doctor mathew baynton olivia colman zawe ashton phoebe waller bridge kyle soller

Peter Capaldi revealed last night that the upcoming 10th series of Doctor Who is set to be his last as the Time Lord. The Christmas 2017 special will see him hand over the TARDIS keys to a new actor, just in time for Chris Chibnall’s first series as showrunner. The 12th Doctor was a fantastic character that Capaldi really made his own. If he’d decided to stay on just a little bit longer, no one would have complained.

And yet, the time has come for a new actor to take on the role. People are already trying to guess who the next Doctor might be and making all sorts of suggestions as to who it should be. 

Here then, are 10 actors who could play the next incarnation of the famous Time Lord.

Here’s a list of ten people who could, perhaps, play the next Doctor. I was suitably aghast when I realised I’d chosen someone who should never play the Doctor, because the Doctor simply isn’t that type of person – but then, maybe it wouldn’t be so awful for an American to play the role? Hahaha. Anyway. My personal preference would be Phoebe Waller-Bridge, I think; previously I’ve said Natalie Dormer, but since watching Fleabag, Phoebe was my main choice.

In fact, I’m pretty much convinced that I was the first person to suggest her for the role on a big platform like this? While I doubt the subsequent storm was down to me, I do take a little hipster pride in it all.

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TV Review: You, Me and the Apocalypse (Episode Seven)

you me and the apocalypse review nbc sky atlantic rob lowe mathew baynton jenna fischer megan mulally joel fry pauline quirke hulu iain holland

You, Me and the Apocalypse is a bold, adrenaline-fuelled comedy-drama about the last days of mankind – boasting a relentlessly entertaining mix of action, adventure, romance and wit set against a backdrop of apocalyptic chaos.

The story follows an eclectic group of seemingly unconnected characters around the world as their lives start to intersect in the most unexpected ways, all triggered by the news that a comet is on an unavoidable collision course towards earth.

This is the first episode picking up after the fairly seismic revelations of last week; there was, obviously, a hell of a lot to live up to here. And I think it’s fair to say that this episode absolutely lived up to those expectations – I’d go so far as to say that it was the best episode of the series so far.

There were three main plot threads to this episode; the most important of which being, I think, the meeting between Jamie and Layla – which has been set up for a while now – and their inevitable confrontation. It was honestly fantastic; Layla is a rather wonderful, and very likeable character. There was a danger, I think, that perhaps the audience wouldn’t like her, given what happened between her and Jamie, but they’ve managed to avoid that entirely; Karla Crome, who plays Layla, gave a great performance. She’s a very charismatic character, in many regards – her courtroom scene is very endearing – but there’s a vulnerability to her which I think would earn her the sympathy of much of the audience.

Mat Baynton once again did a fantastic job with his dual role as the two twins; Jamie, dealing with further revelations about Layla, but at the same time overjoyed to meet his daughter, and Ariel, who remains a complete psychopath. It’s a testament to his acting that he can pull this off so well. Joel Fry was also rather wonderful, still; not just as part of a comic double act, but with his quiet conversation to Layla, about the pain she’s caused Jamie over the years. Really excellent stuff.

Stronger still, I’d say, was the Operation Saviour plot thread. Scotty has become one of my favourite characters, hands down; Kyle Soller did a great job of portraying Scotty agonising over his decisions, showing a genuine depth of internal conflict over whether or not he should turn Rhonda into the police. In the end, he did, because of course he did – it was the fate of the world. It was an absolutely tragic set of circumstances, but it was so well realised, in terms of the acting and the writing. An excellent piece of work from all involved.

That, in fact, was my favourite aspect of the episode – compelling though the meeting between Jamie and Layla was, the story of Scotty, Rhonda, Rajesh and General Gaines was thoroughly absorbing on a whole other level. Genuinely impressive stuff here. The final moment, where Gaines was able to set up a meeting between Rhonda, Scotty and Rajesh was lovely; melancholy and bittersweet, it was a rather wonderful moment.

Father Jude and Sister Celine ended up with the more comedic plotline this week; it turned out that the Messiah they were investigating this week was, in fact, hosting a large orgy. It was quite funny in place (”Ruthless, like Brangelina”), but also prompted Jude and Celine to finally formalise – and consummate – their relationship. Which is… well, it’s been inevitable from the start, and the pair certainly had chemistry together, but I do wonder if it was necessarily the most interesting path to lead the two characters down.

All in all, though, I really, really enjoyed this episode. Two very dramatic, compelling plotlines, and one entertaining and funny plotline. This is certainly the best episode so far.

10/10

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TV Review: You, Me and the Apocalypse (Episode 6)

you me and the apocalypse review nbc sky atlantic rob lowe mathew baynton jenna fischer megan mulally joel fry pauline quirke hulu iain holland

You, Me and the Apocalypse is a bold, adrenaline-fuelled comedy drama about the last days of mankind – boasting a relentlessly entertaining mix of action, adventure, romance and wit set against a backdrop of apocalyptic chaos.

The story follows an eclectic group of seemingly unconnected characters around the world as their lives start to intersect in the most unexpected ways, all triggered by the news that a comet is on an unavoidable collision course towards earth.

This one was… bizarre.

I mean, obviously, it was excellent. Very entertaining; Rhonda and Scotty’s plot this week was particularly well done. The show has managed to create a really interesting group of characters, all with believable motivations and responses to the crises they face. Something I really liked about this episode, actually, was the confrontation between Paterson Joseph’s General Gaines and Kyle Soller’s Scotty; it’s made very clear that they both love each other, and love each other strongly, but to Gaines, the end of the world is much more important than that love. It was a really well realised character moment, in point of fact, and it’s definitely worth commenting on.

But there remains an elephant in the room, because that was just one of the plot threads of this episode. In the other, of course, the paths of Father Jude & Sister Celine, Jamie & Dave, and Ariel & Sutton all crossed over, and there was… a rather seismic revelation.

There’s no way to talk about this without spoiling it, to be completely honest with you. If you haven’t seen it, jump out now – heavy, heavy spoilers abound.

Everyone is related.

Yeah. That’s an Empire Strikes Back level twist – and that’s how they did it. Father Jude is Jamie’s literal Father Jude. Diana Rigg’s Mysterious Old Woman is Jude’s mother. Scotty is Ariel and Jamie’s uncle, making Rhonda their aunt; Jude is Rhonda and Scotty’s brother, and Diana Rigg their mother.

(Incidentally – Pauline Quirke’s speech about the nature of parenthood to Jamie works really well, feeding into larger themes of family throughout the episode. The adoptive family is shown to be much stronger than the genetic one, which is nice. ‘Twas a wonderfully realised scene.)

It’s a really weird twist, and I’m not sure what to think of it.

On the one hand, there’s obviously more explanation coming, and I trust the writers to have come up with something interesting and compelling to go along with it – and yet, on the other hand, I really liked the charm of them being a group of eclectic, unconnected individuals, drawn together by a random series of events. I wonder if perhaps by adding in this connection, they’ve lost some of that charm?

It’s too early to judge, really. For now, it’s just… bizarre. Entirely crazy.

But crazy in a wonderfully entertaining way, and I admire their panache.

8/10

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TV Review: You, Me and the Apocalypse (Episode Five)

you me and the apocalypse review nbc sky atlantic rob lowe mathew baynton jenna fischer megan mulally joel fry pauline quirke hulu iain holland

You, Me and the Apocalypse is a bold, adrenaline-fuelled comedy-drama about the last days of mankind – boasting a relentlessly entertaining mix of action, adventure, romance and wit set against a backdrop of apocalyptic chaos.

The story follows an eclectic group of seemingly unconnected characters around the world as their lives start to intersect in the most unexpected ways, all triggered by the news that a comet is on an unavoidable collision course towards earth.

This week’s episode (well, I say that, it aired a few weeks ago now) was written by Sarah Dollard! (That’s @carrionlaughing, for those of you following at home on tumblr.) Her name stood out to me, actually, when I saw it in the opening credits, because I am a big Doctor Who fan, and obviously I knew that Sarah Dollard is going to be writing the tenth episode of series 9, Face the Raven. I’ve been avoiding plot details for that, more or less, but I do know one thing now – it’s going to be very good.

This fifth episode is very much a transitional one; it’s the mid point in this ten episode series, and you can clearly see a lot of story arcs drawing to a close, and new ones opening up. It’s something that Sarah Dollard handled really well, bringing (in some cases) a sense of closure to this crossroads, with plenty of intrigue following on.

Much like last episode, it’s a great episode for characterisation – much like the whole series, really. Jamie and Dave start to get to know Mary in this episode, and there are some genuinely compelling scenes between them; an obvious one to point to is Jamie’s grief when he finds out about Ariel and ‘Hawkwind’, but the one that stayed with me more was Dave reproaching Jamie for his response to Mary’s delusions – it was a rather powerful moment, actually. The way the show has handled Mary’s mental illness has been impressively sensitive, actually; they’re very careful as to how the other characters respond to her, and just what exactly is played for laughs, and what is a moment of pathos.

I also quite enjoyed the culmination of Rhonda and Leanne’s story; it was similarly well done. It’ll be a shame to see Leanne go, actually – she was a consistently very funny character, and there was a level of depth to her too; the goodbye between her and Rhonda (the circumstances of which were very well chosen) was in fact quite poignant. And, of course, Scotty and General Gaines had a similarly compelling storyline. Kyle Soller is a fantastic actor – fast becoming one of my favourite characters, actually. Very well characterised, from the acting and the writing. Paterson Joseph too is rather wonderful; there’s an interesting potential Doctor in there. (It’s always on the brain.)

Another very strong episode there then! Enjoyed it quite a lot; very much an “end of act one” sort of story, but it’s come at the right time, and it’s got a lot of strengths in its own right.

9/10.

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TV Review: You, Me and the Apocalypse (Episode Four)

you me and the apocalypse review nbc sky atlantic rob lowe mathew baynton jenna fischer megan mulally joel fry pauline quirke hulu iain holland

You, Me and the Apocalypse is a bold, adrenaline-fuelled comedy-drama about the last days of mankind – boasting a relentlessly entertaining mix of action, adventure, romance and wit set against a backdrop of apocalyptic chaos.

The story follows an eclectic group of seemingly unconnected characters around the world as their lives start to intersect in the most unexpected ways, all triggered by the news that a comet is on an unavoidable collision course towards earth.

Now, obviously, since this is a serialised program, and typically the reviews I’m writing for this series a much shorter than my reviews for, say, Doctor Who, I’m trying to find something new to comment on each week, where possible.

This time, we’re going for the strength of the acting, particularly in terms of characterisation. There were three main standouts, in this episode – Rob Lowe as Father Jude, Jenna Fischer as Rhonda, and Mat Baynton as Ariel. Obviously, our other main characters were still entirely at their usual standards – have I mentioned how funny Joel Fry is as Dave? It’s reached a point where I’m wondering how the actor ever fit into something quite so serious as Game of Thrones – clearly, he’s very talented.

Anyway, though.

We’ll start with Rob Lowe, because his performance in this episode as Father Jude was his best of the series so far. Jude is a really interesting character; on the surface, he’s so irreverent and acerbic and cynical, yet he still has a very deep faith. The apparent contradiction between what you’d expect of a Vatican priest and what we’ve actually got is the basis of a pretty compelling character – and in this episode, we got to the heart of that. Jude is a priest because his religion helped him through a very hard time in his life, after the death of his father (something I’m guessing will become relevant soon); Rob Lowe gives a brilliant performance in this episode, trying to talk a man down from suicide – it’s handled with great care and sensitivity, and I think it’s one of the stand out moments of the series so far.

Similarly interesting character development for Rhonda, too, as we get to see just how far she’ll go in her attempts to see her family once again – threatening to kill a young boy, who’s deliberately shown to be not so different from her son. It’s an interesting place to take her to, given that she started out as a meek librarian out of her depths – clearly, she’s been spending too much time with Leanne! Still, though, it’s a compelling character arc to see playing out.

And, finally, Mat Baynton as Ariel. Typically I’ve been commenting on his role as Jamie so far, but I think it’s really worth highlighting just how excellent an actor Mat Baynton is; Jamie and Ariel feel like very distinct and separate characters, with no chance of confusion between them. Often I forget that they’re the same actor – obviously, they’re both identical because they’re the same person, but there’s such a gulf between the two characters, it’s easy not to be conscious of the fact.

But, yes. Mat Baynton did a brilliant job as Ariel, particularly in terms of the final moments of the episode – when he killed Max, it was a genuinely shocking turn, and Ariel was elevated from more than just a dangerous hacker type, but a proper psychopath to be feared; as a villain, he’s going to have repercussions throughout the rest of the series, I’m sure. And it’s very much down to Mat Baynton’s performance, which is really excellent.

This was a really good episode! Possibly the best of the series, in fact. I’m inclined to give it 10/10, actually.

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