The Flash will need to break with formula to survive

the flash dc cw grant gustin hd wallpaper clifford devoe season 5 arrowverse greg berlanti andrew kreisberg harrison wells tom cavanagh

In a way, the shows that operate alongside The Flash are becoming its greatest threat; Arrow, Supergirl and Legends of Tomorrow – and likely eventually Black Lightning – all work from fairly similar formulas to The Flash. (This was particularly evident in Supergirl season one, which mimicked the structure of The Flash season one fairly closely.) While it’s undeniable that each show executes the formula well, when four programmes are executing the same formula in the same way each week, it does start to get a little tired.

And so The Flash needs to evolve – it has to grow beyond the formula it adheres to so closely, and stop sticking to the same structure with every episode. After all, there’s surely only so many times that Barry running faster to beat someone who is also fast can be considered a satisfying payoff to a year of television, no?

A few thoughts on The Flash, and the changes it’ll need to make to continue to grow and develop and stay of a high level of quality. I am fond of the show, of course, but there’s a frustrating feeling that I’ve simply seen it all before – sometimes even four nights a week – and that needs to change. (I didn’t even begin to get into the whole “mentor is secretly evil” thing they’ve done each year!)

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TV Trailer Thoughts | The Flash Season 3

the flash season 3 season 4 barry allen grant gustin wally west kid flash keiynan lonsdale savitar the thinker legends of tomorrow flashpoint

Cards on the table: I thought an adaptation of Flashpoint was a mistake.

Let’s just look back on my review of The Flash Season 2, because past-me articulated my stance far better than current-me would:

As for next year? I am tentatively worried. Flashpoint, to me, seems like a mistake. Primarily, there’s the fact that The Flash has been mining the Flashpoint story for a lot of imagery for a long time, taking different aspects and using them in the way that best suited the show at the time; Barry bringing Iris a video of Eddie, for example, or being electrocuted to regain his speed. That means that if they do try and use any of the more well known aspects of the Flashpoint story, then it’s going to come across as quite repetitive. (Then again, given how much of this series was just season one repackaged and repolished slightly, it’s possible that being repetitive isn’t a huge concern.)

More importantly, though, I feel like it’s moving backwards. Earlier, I mentioned how much I appreciated that The Flash was dedicated to developing each of the characters; one of the best episodes this year, The Runaway Dinosaur, was all about Barry getting past the death of his mother. It was a really poignant episode, and I think can be included as one of the best of the entire show, up there with the season one finale.

But then they threw that away just a few episodes later.

I stand by this, still; the new trailer didn’t do a lot to reassure me. (In fact, since writing that, I’ve actually grown more disinterested in the Flashpoint adaptation because I’ve read the original comic, and watched the animated movie, and found both to be quite underwhelming; they felt to me more of a string of “cool” moments and set pieces, rather than an attempt at emotional storytelling.)

Don’t get me wrong, there looks to be a lot of cool stuff here. I really enjoy alternate takes on characters I already know, and looking at parallel universe versions of them; the new timeline has the potential to be quite engaging. It looks to me at the minute as though Wally is going to be the Flash in this new dimension; while I’m not expecting him to retain these powers when the timeline is fixed, I think this is probably foreshadowing a point later on in the season when he will gain powers in the proper timeline. (I’m a little disappointed to see another speedster villain, though, and I dearly hope that this is confined solely to the flashpoint timeline; The Flash is quite heavily running the risk of getting too repetitive with speedster villains.)

Part of me is slightly concerned that what we’ve seen here is actually just an edited down version of the first episode; from the filming reports I’ve been following, it seems they’ve only recently started episode 2, which does suggest that all of this footage is simply from the premier episode. I hope that’s not the case; I kinda feel like the only thing that would bother me more than doing Flashpoint would be to rush it. It seems to me that this is something that should, at the very least, get two-parter, because 40 minutes really doesn’t feel like enough. (I’m particularly hoping to see a considerable number of scenes between Barry and his mother, because I feel that this was a crucial aspect that the original story was lacking.)

In the end, I’m still looking forward to this new season of The Flash a lot. After all, I do really love the show; while I felt that there were, perhaps, a few missteps with the second season, on the whole it remained quite fantastic. I know that it’s going to remain consistently entertaining, and to be quite honest, I’ll probably still quite enjoy the flashpoint episodes too.

It’s just that, right now, this trailer hasn’t quite convinced me, and I’m feeling just a little underwhelmed by it all.

Ah well.

Related:

The Flash Season 2 Review

What will a DC TV Flashpoint look like?

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The Flash Season 2 Review

the flash season 2 review grant gustin barry allen zoom greg berlanti hd review image

So, I have some thoughts, and I want to work through them here. You can find my reviews of the first 9 episodes of the season here; I never managed to review the subsequent episodes, sadly. Hopefully, I’ll get around to that at some point, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it was quite a while away.

Last year, the first season of The Flash was my favourite television show that was on at the time. It was genuinely fantastic – possibly one of the best superhero programmes on television, a wonderful blend of exciting action and moving emotional arcs, which all came together to create something truly compelling. The season finale, Fast Enough, is one of the best hours of television I’ve ever seen.

I don’t feel like Season 2 managed to hit the same highs.

That’s understandable, of course; it was a very high standard to meet, and a high bar to cross. Certainly, the series started well, and there were lots of fantastic elements throughout. To be entirely honest, my issues with the show were entirely idiosyncratic; I know for a lot of people, it still worked really well. But we’ll get to that in a minute, because first I do want to highlight the parts I enjoyed and think worked really well.

A few months before the season began, I wrote an article about the five things I’d like to see in the coming year. One of the most important, for me, was further development of Iris’ character; I’d always liked her across the first season, but I felt that she was a bit under utilised at times. Thankfully, this was remedied this year; I think Iris was quite well served as a character across this season. She’s really grown and developed, and I appreciate that a lot – it’s great to see Iris in STAR Labs, fitting in and helping out. Part of what I enjoyed, actually, was the fact that she gives a different perspective to the other characters; dramatically speaking, I think this works really well with the dynamic of the show. So, that was great.

And, you know, that’s generally true of all the characters, not just Iris. Something I mentioned in one of my earlier reviews (I think it was Enter Zoom, perhaps) was how much I loved the fact that The Flash still made the effort to include emotional scenes, and to develop their characters each week. It would have been very easy for them to drop the ball on that, and just focus on the action, but they never did; The Flash was always a program that was really grounded in making sure the characters would progress and move forward and change across the season.

Initially, I’d been quite sceptical of Zoom, because I wasn’t sure that featuring a speedster villain as the Big Bad again was the right idea. It felt a little too much like they’d be boxing themselves in, and setting a precedent that would only limit and constrain them in the future. It felt, to me, quite important that we had a villain who wasn’t a speedster as the Big Bad, not just to stop it from being repetitive, but also to demonstrate that there were still a variety of different tricks that the program could deploy.

But – at the start of the season, at least – Zoom worked really well! His first proper episode, Enter Zoom, set him up as a really powerful antagonist; it made great use of a narrative collapse to demonstrate quite how heavyweight a threat he was, and how significant he was as an individual. I was really impressed at quite how imposing they’d made him, and I had high hopes for the rest of the season.

the flash series 2 enter zoom hunter zolomon jay garrick teddy sears eddie thawne fight hd image

However.

Zoom, as an antagonist, ceased to work the moment they revealed him to be Jay Garrick, or Hunter Zolomon, or whoever. Immediately, there’s the fact that this twist was needlessly over complicated to the point that it was evident it was only for shock value, and the fact they could surprise us with “Jay Garrick is evil”. The explanation involving time remnants never quite worked, and the fact that Harry never recognised Jay as the extremely famous serial killer Hunter Zolomon despite his not wearing a mask is certainly something that stretches belief. Worse, this reveal also makes Zoom even more derivative of last year’s villain – not only was he a speedster, he was also Barry’s trusted mentor. It worked the first time; with Zoom, they hit a point of diminishing returns.

Further, though, it became readily apparent that he was just an extremely weak villain. A psychopath who’s obsessed with being the fastest is a starting point, yes, but it’s far from a particularly nuanced one. The writers tried to bring in that “we’re not so different, you and I” aspect to develop him somewhat, but does anyone really buy that anymore? The villain trying to convince the hero that they’re the same is not only a cliché, it’s also evidently untrue of Barry. What’s the point? Little was achieved with that.

(I am quite firmly of the mind that Zoom should, in fact, have been revealed to be Eddie Thawne. In fact, I’d begun typing up something of an explanation for that in this post, before realising that it would start to get a little too long winded. So, look forward to a separate post about that soon.)

Similarly, I was unimpressed at the relationship between Hunter and Caitlin – even when we all thought he was just Jay included. It was a little disappointing to me that the only character arc the writers seemed able to conceive of for Caitlin was to put her into a relationship again, and then to repeat the same grief plot once more. That was a shame, really, and the fact that Caitlin was sidelined generally didn’t help either. I know that in part this was because of Danielle Panabaker’s injury disrupting shooting schedules, but even in the latter half of the season, it felt like her involvement was being minimised. So, yeah, that wasn’t so great.

Towards the end of the season, it did start to become abundantly clear that they were lacking plot, and having to stretch it out to fit the full 23 episode order. It became evident as each story was increasingly dependent on the characters making bad choices for no apparent reason. That’s not mistakes, of course; I’ve no problem with something like that. But it was almost an example of the “idiot ball” trope – the characters ended up beginning to make choices that were completely ignorant of information already established in the program. (Why are you trying to send Zoom back to Earth 2, when you know he can open breaches of his own? Why are you giving up your speed to save Wally, if you’re already far faster than Zoom and can just grab Wally there and then?) There’s not even really the excuse that the characters weren’t aware, because of course they were the ones who had given us that exposition in the first place. Certainly, that was lacking in oversight, and needed a rewrite or to.

As for next year? I am tentatively worried. Flashpoint, to me, seems like a mistake. Primarily, there’s the fact that The Flash has been mining the Flashpoint story for a lot of imagery for a long time, taking different aspects and using them in the way that best suited the show at the time; Barry bringing Iris a video of Eddie, for example, or being electrocuted to regain his speed. That means that if they do try and use any of the more well known aspects of the Flashpoint story, then it’s going to come across as quite repetitive. (Then again, given how much of this series was just season one repackaged and repolished slightly, it’s possible that being repetitive isn’t a huge concern.)

More importantly, though, I feel like it’s moving backwards. Earlier, I mentioned how much I appreciated that The Flash was dedicated to developing each of the characters; one of the best episodes this year, The Runaway Dinosaur, was all about Barry getting past the death of his mother. It was a really poignant episode, and I think can be included as one of the best of the entire show, up there with the season one finale.

But then they threw that away just a few episodes later.

I have no doubt that next year will be an entertaining season of The Flash. And I really want to stress the fact that this was still a good season – “not as good as last year” is still pretty damn good, considering how fantastic The Flash was in its first season. Inarguably, it was better than Arrow in every conceivable way. There were lots of fantastic episodes and new concepts introduced; going to Earth-2 was giddyingly fun, seeing Tom Cavanagh create a new spin on Wells was compulsively watchable, and I really liked our new characters of Jessie and Wally this year. So, certainly, it was still really good television. That’s part of why I’m still hoping to get to do my individual episode reviews, just to provide a degree more nuance in my approach and make it clear how much I really did enjoy this season.

However, almost because of that, there’s something a little more disappointing about the areas in which this season fell down. The issues (or, issues as I saw them, from my own very idiosyncratic and personal perspective) were all ones that could have been very easily remedied. Fairly simple fixes applied throughout would have helped this year to be just as good, if not better, as last year.

Onto next season, then. I’m sure it’ll be here in a flash.

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The Flash: Is Barry Allen going to die?

the flash barry allen wally west death the death of barry allen grant gustin keiynan lonsdale

Grant Gustin plays Barry on the CW at the minute, but Ezra Miller is set to depict this iteration of the Scarlett Speedster in a big screen release slated for 2017. Judging by the precedent [of killing television characters before their cinematic counterparts debut] established on Arrow, we may well see Barry bite the bullet before the end of the third season – perhaps even as early as the midseason finale.

You’d think, of course, that this is impossible; after all, he is the main character of the show. Interestingly though, that may not be entirely the case.

In the comics that the show has spawned from, the Flash is a legacy character; a mantle inherited by many different people. Barry Allen is one of the most well-known, yes, but far from the only – and this year, we’ve been introduced to television versions of two other individuals who have been the Flash: Jay Garrick and Wally West. Notably, Barry Allen was, for quite some time, known as a character who died; in 1985, Barry was killed during the Crisis on Infinite Earths plotline, and the role of the Flash was taken on by Wally West. Barry remained dead for twenty five years – a record time for a comic book character.

It’s possible, then, that this is a storyline they’d choose to adapt for the third season of The Flash; with the movie outing being released in 2017, the midseason finale of series 3 and last episode of 2016 may well be the last time we see Grant Gustin as Barry Allen.

A theory about The Flash, and what we might see from it in future. Increasingly I think I’m finding that one of the aspects of superheroes that interests me most – or, one of the aspects we don’t see that interests me most – is that whole idea of legacy heroes, of one person taking up the mantle of another.

It seemed to me like a really interesting way of doing things on The Flash, at least for a while; kill off Barry in the midseason finale, let Wally take over as the Flash for the next 13 episodes, then in the season finale tease a possible return for Barry, then working towards that can be the arc for the first nine episodes of the next season. They never did it, of course, but it’d be interesting to see.

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TV Review: The Flash – The Fury of Firestorm (2×04)

The Flash Logo review analysis retrospective barry allen grant gustin greg berlanti andrew kreisberg cw

Sometimes great possibilities are right in front of us and we don’t see them because we choose not to. I think that we need to be open to exploring something new.

They managed to pull off the same cliffhanger twice in the past two weeks, which I was quite impressed by. Both of the last two episodes ended with Professor Stein in some sort of medical distress; it was a clever device which has set up a rather tense emergency at the beginning of this particular episode.

Now, admittedly, going into this episode, I already knew a fair bit about what was going to happen, because I’ve been following the news about Legends of Tomorrow with a fair bit of excitement. It had always been obvious, I think, that even though Ronnie was no longer part of the show, there would be a Firestorm of some sort of another. And going by the casting announcements, I already knew we’d be seeing Franz Drameh as the new Firestorm, as opposed to… Demore Barnes, who played Henry Hewitt.

But, to be honest, I don’t feel like that was a problem; certainly, I don’t think I’ve missed out any important aspects of the episode, and I’ve more or less derived the same level of enjoyment from it that I would either way – which was, to be clear, a fair bit. It was a good episode!

I’ve always enjoyed the Firestorm central episodes, actually, because Victor Garber as Professor Stein is one of my favourite supporting characters, hands down. He’s an excellent actor, giving a brilliant performance; I enjoy seeing his character a hell of a lot. There’s always some great humour from him and his interactions with the other regular cast, but a fair bit of pathos too; despite the fact I knew Stein wasn’t going to die, there was some genuine emotion surrounding his circumstances in this episode.

Franz Drameh as the new Firestorm was also impressive, but I’m not sure if this was the best possible debut he could have had. I think that in part it’s because his origin was held back by a few clichés – specifically the lost football scholarship aspect, which felt overly familiar. But, on the flip side, they did a pretty good job of setting up some interesting character elements as best they could within the constraints of a 45 minute episode; I’m hoping that his reluctance to be a hero is expanded on somewhat in Legends of Tomorrow, because it seems like an angle that has a lot of potential to it.

the flash review the fury of firestorm martin stein jax jefferson star labs victor garber franz drameh legends of tomorrow

More interesting to me, admittedly, was the further development of the plotline featuring Iris’ mother – and the first reference to her brother, the as of yet unnamed Wally West. As I’ve said in my previous reviews, I’m really enjoying the weightier plotlines given to Iris this year, and I very much appreciate the continuation of them here.

It’s been really well handled, I think, and a lot of that comes down to the acting skills of Candice Patton, Jesse L Martin and Vanessa Williams, who plays Francine West. It’s a very interesting dynamic they’ve set up; Francine is clearly a struggling woman, even broken, and Iris is consistently very forceful in her dealings with her mother, because of the betrayal she feels. They’ve managed to give the characters entirely believable motivations, and their actions clearly stem from said motivations; the use of the MacGregors disease (which is from Batman and Robin, according to the internet) added a great layer of pathos to the whole thing.

It was also interesting to see another nod to Joe West’s lying in this episode, when he chooses to hide the sighting of Professor Wells at Mercury Labs from Barry. As a character flaw, it’s quite impressive, and it definitely has legs (haha) for them to run with it (hahaha) – it’s a subtle little thing, but it certainly has potential, and I’m glad that they’re turning it an actual facet of his character.

(Though, having said that, I sometimes worry if the character moments they throw in can be too subtle? It seemed clear to me that part of the reason why Caitlin has been placing so much emphasis on Professor Stein’s health in previous weeks, and her borderline desperation to save him this week, is because she sees him as her last link to Ronnie – and, similarly, the educated scientist Henry Hewitt reminded her of Ronnie far more than mechanic Jay Jackson. It was clearly there in subtext, but I wonder if perhaps that aspect would have been stronger had it been made more overt?)

the flash review KING SHARK patty spivot the flash vs king shark grant gustin earth 2 cgi

The rest of the episode was similarly entertaining too, of course. I love the fact that they used a character like King Shark – who’s properly expensive for them to render in CGI – as little more than a throwaway joke. That’s genuinely hilarious, in more ways than one, and I really admire the panache of The Flash.

Shantel VanSanten remains completely charming; Patty Spivot is a wonderful character, really brightening up the show every time she makes an appearance. Genuinely love the character, she’s wonderful. (Which is making me think she’s going to end up dead by the end of the series, which would be a huge shame. Hopefully we can avoid that particular route.)

And, of course, the cliffhanger ending is worthy of comment – Harrison Wells is back.

Brilliant. I love Wells. I’m so looking forward to seeing where this goes.

8/10

Related:

The Flash reviews

Supergirl reviews

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TV Review: The Flash – The Man Who Saved Central City (2×01)

The Flash Logo review analysis retrospective barry allen grant gustin greg berlanti andrew kreisberg cw

My name is Barry Allen, and I am the fastest man alive. It’s been six months since the Singularity. I’m on my own now. Decided it’s better that way. Keeps the people I care about safe.

The Flash is back! I have been looking forward to this ever since the season finale, which was possibly one of the best episodes of TV I watched during that year. Certainly, it was the best piece of superhero related TV that I watched that year, easily trumping both Gotham and Agents of SHIELD, and subjectively more enjoyable than most of Daredevil in terms of my own personal tastes. I’ve had October 6th marked on my calendar since May. (And I’ve had the 13th October marked on my calendar since I realised that the 6th was only the US airdate.)

Essentially, then, expectations were high for this episode. Last year’s Fast Enough ended on one of those cliffhangers – you know the sort where it’s really aggravating, because you’re really into the plot, and it’s got you on the edge of your seat, and then it’s got you standing shouting at the TV screen, but you know you can’t begrudge the show that, because it’s been so brilliant, it’s really earned that cliffhanger? (No one knows what I mean? Really? Oh, well, that’s the type of cliffhanger that it was, anyway.)

Rather cleverly, I think, they chose to subvert expectations and not pick up immediately from after the cliffhanger – they shifted a little bit, moved the setting around, and we picked up 6 months later, with a well executed dream sequence. It’s not the sort of thing I’m typically very fond of, but I think it worked rather well here – the direction was quite well done, and subtly pointed to the fact that it was a dream sequence, before the appearance of Eddie and Wells really confirmed that. The slow pan around the room, and then zooming out, served to emphasis how alone Barry had made himself, and quite how empty the cortex is without the rest of the STAR Labs team joining Barry. Again, that’s down to the direction – it worked very well.

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Now, admittedly, what I am not so certain of is quite how well they used this concept. I’m in two minds about it all, really – on the one hand, I’m glad that the production team have their own view of the Flash as being a relatively bright and optimistic hero, and I doubt that dwelling on Barry isolating himself would really have worked here.

But, equally, since they brought it up, I want them to have explored it, you know? We have a missing six months, which genuinely sound to have been quite interesting – I want to know about the immediate aftermath of the singularity. How did Cisco begin to work with Joe? What’s been happening to Caitlin? How did Iris cope with the death of Eddie? How did Dr. Stein and Caitlin cope, in their own different ways, with the death of Ronnie? The consequences and repercussions of the finale all seem to have been paid lip service, but essentially skipped over for a reset of the status quo.

It bothers me a little, because I feel like we maybe lost out a little bit; would it have worked better as a three episode arc, at the start of the series? An episode focused on Barry, an episode largely focused on Cisco and Joe, with episode three being where they get the band back together? It’s hard to say. That might certainly have been more effective in telling the story of those repercussions, but that doesn’t seem to be the story they’re interested in telling – the production team wants to get onto the story of the Multiverse, with Zoom and Jay Garrick.

And, you know, it is hard to begrudge them that, because I am really very excited for that story…

the flash the man who saved central city review flash day mayor keystone grant gustin gabrielle stanton ralph hemecker

Another thing that I quite liked was the concept of Flash day. It’s an interesting idea that really seems to have legs (haha), and I hope they really run with it (hahaha). It’s setting up the fact that the Flash, unlike Arrow, is a much more of a public figure – the city knows about him, and they like him, too. It’s something that I think they can do quite a lot with, so I’m looking forward to seeing where that goes.

As ever, it was nice to see all the different characters returning – Barry, Caitlin, Cisco, Iris, Joe, and Dr Stein. Lots of fun moments from the all; Cisco remains as funny as ever, and it was great to see some scenes between Joe and Iris, which was one of the things I’d been hoping to see from this series. (The full list is linked to at the bottom of the page.)

Of course, one of the most important moments of the episode was the release of Henry Allen from prison, as a result of Harrison Wells’ confession video. That was a genuinely fantastic moment, which really added to the complex nature of the relationship between Barry and Wells. (There’s a link to an analysis of that at the bottom of the page.) I’m really looking forward to seeing Tom Cavanagh return at various points throughout this series.

Henry Allen’s release and return home was rather well handled, I felt; Grant Gustin and John Wesley Shipp conveyed the emotion of it well, and it was nice to see everyone together at the welcome home party, happy and laughing. I’m not so sure about their reason to remove Henry, admittedly – I realise that they couldn’t keep JWS as a season regular, but perhaps it’d have been easier if he’d simply said that he’d rather live away from Central City, but he wants Barry to visit him as often as possible? It felt that the reason they gave was a little weak and contrived.

Still, though. This was a fun episode, and whilst it wasn’t quite at the same heights as the best of last series, it was a strong opener, that managed to balance most of its responsibilities reasonably well. Very much looking forward to next week’s episode! 7/10

(I actually found a set of deleted scenes online, which you can see here, here, and here. I think the episode would have improved a fair bit if they’d been kept it, so it’s a shame they were lost!)

Related:

The Flash reviews

Supergirl reviews

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The Flash: Why I love Harrison Wells

the flash tom cavanagh harrison wells grant gustin barry allen reverse flash greg berlanti andrew kreisberg series 1 fast enough fastest man alive central city star labs wheelchair

So, over the past year, one of my favourite TV shows has been The Flash. It was a genuinely fun and compelling show, with an amazing cast and quality writing, which was always really exciting to watch. Cannot wait for next series, I’m really looking forward to it.

One of the key things I liked so much about The Flash was the character of Harrison Wells, played brilliantly by Tom Cavanagh. (Spoilers from here on out, by the way.)

Wells is Barry’s mentor. He helps him to save others, supports him in his endeavours, and teaches him things about his own abilities. But the fact is, he has a secret agenda – he’s actually the man who killed Barry’s mother, Eobard Thawne, the Reverse Flash. He travelled from the future to kill Barry in the past because he hates him that much.

“I come here to destroy you, but then to get home, I have to be the one who creates you”

There’s a really interesting irony at the heart of this, which is summed up by that line – Wells has to be the one to create his worst enemy. Every interaction they have, even though Barry doesn’t know it, carries with it a history – and a future – of so much conflict and hatred for one another.

But, brilliantly, it’s not that simple. Because Wells does begin to care about Barry.

I know that rage. I used to feel that rage every time I looked upon you. And now, somehow, I know what Joe, and Henry, feel when they look upon you with pride, and with love.”

I suppose it could be argued with relative ease that Wells is simply lying here, with the hope of manipulating Barry, but I like to believe it’s a bit more complicated than that – the fact that his hatred for the Barry he knew, and his love for the Barry he has come to know, can and do coexist is one of the more compelling aspects of the narrative, to my mind.

It’s an interesting new take on the idea of the hero’s mentor being the hero’s enemy, and one which also presents some compelling possibilities for future stories: Barry will, eventually, have a “first” meeting with Thawne at a point before he’s Harrison Wells (presumably played by Matt Lescher in this instance). There’d be a lot of parallels between these interactions, and the ones we’ve already seen on the show so far – the positions would be reversed, with Barry knowing and hating Thawne based on past interactions that are all still ahead of Thawne.

How would Barry deal with him? Is he able to do anything to stop him, knowing that he has to keep the past – and future – intact? (Actually, given the weird timey wimey nature of The Flash at the minute, how much of this is still predetermined?)

Or, in a moment of maximum dramatic irony… Will Barry’s hatred of Thawne lead to Thawne’s hatred of Barry? Will Barry create the Reverse Flash, in much the same way that Wells created the Flash?

Honestly, I think it’s likely. And I am really looking forward to it.

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