Weekly Watchlist #9 (28th Oct – 3rd Nov)

Much more stuff this week!

Daybreak (Netflix)

This has really captivated me – very easy to dismiss as derivative (because, well, it absolutely is), but with just enough flourish to occasionally feel very inspired. Oddly, it’s not the most confident show – for every step it takes towards a new idea, it quickly hurries two steps back to comforting archetypes – but when it gets things right it absolutely soars. I’d struggle to recommend it wholeheartedly, but at the same time it’s clearly not a bad show: just one I wish was a little more willing to trust its best instincts.

Defending the Guilty (BBC Two)

It never quite managed to solve the flaw I highlighted a while ago – the lack of development for Will’s girlfriend – which becomes harder to ignore as the series concluded. At the same time, though, I still really enjoyed this: it’s funny and it’s moving, with a brilliant cast and a killer soundtrack. The ending invites a second series I’m not sure is wholly needed – but I really can’t wait for more.

House of Games (BBC Two)

I normally tend not to include all the quiz shows I watch in these listings, but I just wanted to note for posterity that I got an answer about Virginia Woolf very quickly this week, and I was very proud of myself.

That’s all.

In the Long Run (Sky One)

It’s easy to forget just how good a comic talent Idris Elba is, given his more high-profile outings tend towards the dramatic – even then, this loosely-autobiographical piece feels like it’s flown especially under the radar, not really making a huge impact on people’s impressions of Elba. (I’d bet more people know about his DJ work than this show. Actually, I’d bet more people would know him from Bond rumours than this show, and that’s probably never going to happen.)

That’s a shame – In the Long Run is a charming, funny little show, the sort of thing that I could very easily see being just as loved as Derry Girls or Stath Lets Flats if it too had found a home at Channel 4.

Motherland (BBC Two)

Admittedly, “I really can’t wait for more” is also exactly how I felt about Motherland’s first series; this year’s effort is much more easily written off. I could never quite put my finger on what changed – and maybe if I went back and rewatched the first series, I’d be disappointed by that as well. Either way, it’s been a disappointing year

Riverdale (Netflix)

Halloween is absolutely the best time of year for Riverdale. Wait a few months and I’ll say the same about Christmas, though – this is a show that really thrives on excess and exaggeration, so the heightened nature of any holiday always makes for an especially fun instalment of Riverdale nonsense.

Superstore & The Good Place (NBC, Netflix)

Doing these ones together, because I remain of basically the same mind about each – Superstore is just about recovering from a rough start, while The Good Place continues to tread water, increasingly prompting me to realise again (as is the case with every new season of The Good Place) that I just don’t love it. Both these shows might end up bumped from the weekly watchlist – I’ll still keep on top of them, of course, but I’m definitely not going to have something new to say about them each week.

Favourite show of October: I suspect ‘favourite’ is probably the wrong word here – I’d want to very heavily caveat it in this instance – but Daybreak is undeniably the show that’s made the most impression on me, and I suspect the one I’ll be thinking about longest.

Best new show of October: Again, I think it has to be Daybreak.

Most looking forward to in November: Lot of possibilities here – I have high hopes for His Dark Materials, some measured interest in a few of the Apple+ shows, and I haven’t quite got around to Watchmen yet so we’ll call that a November show – but it’s hard not to choose The End of the F***ing World series 2. Absolutely loved the first series, and really curious to see how Jessica Barden fills the role of the lead.

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Weekly Watchlist #5 (30th Sept – 6th Oct)

weekly watchlist 5 phoebe waller bridge saturday night live fleabag posh malcolm tucker peter capaldi superstore the thick of it

Slightly shorter one this week!

Defending the Guilty (BBC Two)

I liked it already, of course, but when they used my favourite Wolf Alice song? That’s when I loved it.

Saturday Night Live (NBC)

I’ve never quite bought into the whole “Fleabag is too posh” line of criticism – not as much as I probably should have, anyway – but the sheer level of contempt on display in that Love Island sketch made me quite uncomfortable, actually.

(The rest of it, obviously, was predictably throwaway fare. Still, Taylor Swift was pretty good.)

Succession (HBO, Sky Atlantic)

One thing I quite enjoy about Succession is all those cutting little jokes about journalism. “Here’s ten reasons why you’re never getting paid”. Yeah. Yeah.

Superstore (NBC)

An improvement over last week, definitely, although I’m still getting the feeling that something is just a little off – which is odd, really. There’s no way, surely, that the head writer moving to more of a producer-only role should have this much of an impact – it’s a way too auteuristic model of understanding a network sitcom, of all things, and anyway his replacements have been working on the show since the start. But at the same time, something definitely feels not quite right. I wonder if maybe it’s me, and simply knowing that something has changed behind the scenes is enough to make things feel different. Hmm.

The Good Place (NBC, Netflix)

One day I’ll get it. It’s still, you know, fine – although definitely hurting itself by sidelining William Jackson Harper, who’s always been one of the best bits of the show.

The Thick of It (BBC Two, Netflix)

Been watching this in my spare time, mainly because I’ve never seen it before, and I figured it was worth catching up on just so I could understand all the references people made. It’s quite fun. Probably there is lots to be written about what it tells us about politics in hindsight, to, uh, varying levels of insight, but mostly what stood out was a throwaway line about how scandalous a Tory MP doing blackface is… in the same week that Desmond Swayne was all over the news openly boasting about having done blackface in the past.

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Weekly Watchlist #4 (23rd Sept – 29th Sept)

weekly watchlist 4 fleabag live phoebe waller bridge the politician ben platt the good place kristen bell ted danson netflix

And another one. Still working out exactly what I want these to look like, but I think they’re starting to take shape a bit better.

Defending the Guilty (BBC Two)

Again, I’m really enjoying this, particularly as it began to fill in the rest of the cast a little more this week. I think the main thing it needs to do, and do quite quickly, is make more of an effort to characterise the lead character’s girlfriend – at the moment she’s not much more than a cipher, which would be a flaw even if a lot of the drama didn’t pivot around Will Sharpe’s character’s relationships.

Fleabag Live! (National Theatre Live)

I don’t think I’ve ever been quite so conscious of how important Sian Clifford is to Fleabag until she wasn’t in it. That was my primary takeaway, anyway, and what I kept thinking throughout this not-actually-live-but-repeat-recording-of-the-live-version showing of Fleabag that I went to see this week. (The same is sort of true of Hugh Dennis too, actually, although to a much lesser extent.)

What I was also trying to work out, though, was Fleabag series 2 – I am, I think, one of the few people for which that didn’t entirely click (although I’m of the mind that I must’ve surely just missed something). It struck me that the ending of Fleabag series 2 was an almost complete refutation of the ending of series 1 – I’ll go into this properly someday I’m sure – so I was interested to see if, maybe, that was the DNA of the spikier stage show resurfacing. Not so, though; the way Fleabag’s first series adapts the stage show is obvious, and the second series remains a mystery to me.

Succession (HBO, Sky Atlantic)

If all was right in the world, Jeremy Strong would get lots and lots of awards for this. He’s sublime.

Superstore (NBC)

Superstore is an all-time favourite of mine – the cliffhanger that closed season 4 has already earned it a place on the best of 2019 list, no question. It was the sort of moment that felt like it was breaking genuinely new ground for a network sitcom, positioning Superstore as a vital, urgent piece of television, the sort of thing that genuinely earns a place in television history.

The fifth series opener threw me a little, though – I’m not sure if it was behind the scenes changes, or maybe it’s just not quite possible to live up to the weight of expectation generated by a big moment like that (I’m quite consciously trying to avoid revealing it here), but I was a tad disappointed by this. Looking forward to next week anyway, though.

The Circle (Channel 4)

This is surprisingly engrossing – it’s mostly a load of nonsense, as tends to be the case with reality TV, but there’s something about the Big Brother crossed with Catfish premise that’s becoming increasingly difficult to look away from, even before they threw Richard Madeley pretending to be a 27 year old woman into the mix.

The Good Place (Netflix)

More than anything else on television at the moment, The Good Place makes me feel slightly out of step with everyone else. I just don’t like it that much! It’s… fine. It’s nice, it’s often sweet, and sometimes I quite enjoy it. It feels friendly, and that’s neat. But by the same stroke, it’s often unbearably twee, deeply, overly saccharine, and at times it’s actually quite irritating. It’s not bad, or not bad enough to be worth some attempt at a takedown – but I do feel so, so out of step with the general critical consensus on this one, since everyone’s hailing it as the most revolutionary comedy since, well, the genre was invented it sometimes feels like.

It is very conceptually striking at times, and it’s often quite inventive – what I do find sort of notable actually is that the stretch I’ve enjoyed the most, series 3, seems to be the consensus weakest season – but for the most part I struggle to click with it. I think I just don’t find it particularly funny (I’ve always enjoyed it more when I stopped expecting it to be funny, I think), and I’m always slightly baffled when some screencap goes viral on twitter.

“Stonehenge was a sex thing”, says a CGI elephant. I mean, sure, okay.

The Politician (Netflix)

This is peak Ryan Murphy, and – I say this with genuine admiration – quite neatly filled a Riverdale-shaped hole in my heart.

Favourite show of September: Has to be Succession, really.

Best new show of September: Going to go with Defending the Guilty, actually, which I’ve been quietly impressed by.

Most looking forward to in October: Oh, it could only be Riverdale, my one true love, even now.

You can look at other Weekly Watchlists here. If you liked this article and you want to support what I do, you can leave a tip over on ko-fi, or back my Patreon here.

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Weekly Watchlist #3 (16th Sept – 22nd Sept)

weekly watchlist 3 defending the guilty will sharpe loudest voice russell crowe roger ailes the cameron years david cameron on the record

Back again.

Defending the Guilty (BBC Two)

Started watching this because it had Will Sharpe in it, mainly, and he was so good in Flowers. Actually I figured he’d be writing this too, which was a big part of why I was interested (again, really, go and watch Flowers, he wrote it, it’s brilliant) – he didn’t write it, but he’s still great in it, so it balances out I think.

I liked it, anyway, and I’m definitely inclined to stick with it. It’s quite ostentatiously pilot-y in places, paying off lines from earlier in the episode right up until the credits, and you can definitely sense how specifically constructed it’s been – but, equally, there’s an obvious level of competence to it that stops it ever feeling grating. The cast are hugely charming, too, and this has clearly got the potential to develop into something pretty memorable.

Euphoria (HBO, Sky Atlantic)

What I like most about Euphoria is the moments when it realises it doesn’t have to be realistic. I mean, granted, it’s never that realistic – it thrives in the space that separates optimism and cynicism, fantasy and nightmare, never quite the parents’ worst fears nor the teens’ great expectations, injecting both with a note of scepticism and, lets be honest, deep pretension – but still. Recognising that it often already veers on the exaggerated, because stories about teenagers always do, leaning into that is where its most impressive – so sidestepping any obligation to realism to instead commit to a 70s crime drama spoof, or indeed a Larry Stylinson sex scene, is where Euphoria is at its best. (Although, that said, I’m never fond of those House-esque ‘inside the body’ medical shots. Don’t bother, they’re never worth it.)

It still isn’t perfect. (Well, Zendaya is, but everything around her somewhat less so.) I’m not sure if I’d like it to lean a little further into the almost anthology-esque style of the openings focused on each character, or to go the other way and integrate the plotlines a little more – or, indeed, if that’d make a difference at all. But it’s been a mostly strong if occasionally shaky series so far, and I’m interested to see how the finale ties that all together.

Stath Lets Flats (Channel 4)

I say this after every episode of Stath Lets Flats, but I think A Stressfully Date is the best episode of the series so far. I mentioned already how impressive Jamie Demetriou’s knack for physical comedy is, but so are all those idiosyncratic little word choices – “like a red metal” is basically meaningless, but in context, it’s sublime.

Succession (HBO, Sky Atlantic)

I would watch a Tom/Cousin Greg spinoff. Or, really, just more of them every episode. Consistently my favourite part of any given episode, alongside all my other favourite parts of any given episode.

The Cameron Years & The David Cameron Interview (BBC One & ITV)

Putting these ones together because in many respects they were functionally identical – actually, I wouldn’t be entirely surprised if Cameron’s sections in each were recorded on the same day, as part of the same press session?

Anyway, I wasn’t especially impressed – neither were anywhere close to interrogative enough, they were far too passive to be of much note. Specifically the BBC version, actually; I wasn’t especially impressed by the choice to remove the journalist’s side of the conversation, presenting it solely as Cameron’s own narration, straight to camera. Not a huge amount of room for insight – it’s probably the longest advert for a book I’ve ever sat through.

The Loudest Voice (Showtime, Sky Atlantic)

The second episode is where I started to understand The Loudest Voice better, I think – its 9/11 episode is an often frantic, at times chilling piece, and I think here starts to make the case for this series as something approaching a vital piece of drama.

You can look at other Weekly Watchlists here. If you liked this article and you want to support what I do, you can leave a tip over on ko-fi, or back my Patreon here.

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