Maysaloun Hamoud on her new movie Bar Bahar/In Between, Palestinian cinema, and more

In Between Bar Bahar Maysaloun Hamoud Interview Sana Jammalieh Shaden Kanboura Mouna Hawa Shlomi Elkabetz fatwa palestine ophir israel tel aviv hd screenshot poster wallpaper

I just think that I was talking about the conservative people all over the world. This story is particular, for sure, as a Palestinian woman, but at the same they are so universal. I think all women all over the world, and not just the women; the men that you see in the movies are around us, all over the world. Just a difference of faces and names, I can see, but these dilemmas and these conflicts, you can find the everywhere. In London, in Britain, everywhere in Europe, everywhere in the States, everywhere in Latin America and the Far East, anywhere you want. Because this is how humanity behaves through the world and discrimination against women is everywhere.

An interview I’m particularly proud of – here’s my chat with Maysaloun Hamoud, who directed Bar Bahar, or In Between.

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Star Trek: Discovery Season 1 Episode 2 Review – Battle at the Binary Stars

star trek discovery battle at the binary stars vulcan hello salute michael burnham sonequa martin green shenzou klingons review analysis bryan fuller

Star Trek has always been at its most interesting when it engages with the inherent imperialism of the Federation, taking a post-colonial view of an organisation, which is arguably just as much a space empire as that of the Klingons. For these Klingons to focus on their need for individualism in the face of this increasingly ubiquitous galactic hegemony immediately posits them as more interesting than they’ve ever been, adding a greater nuance to their status as a warrior race. 

Immediately, this presents a huge amount of potential, making it perhaps the most important reinvention the Klingons have underwent since The Next Generation; no longer are the Klingons confined to a simple “planet of the hats” mentality. Suddenly, this is an alien race with a vitality – they’re not fighting simply because their culture demands it, rather they fight to defend their culture. It’s a subtle distinction, but an important one; certainly, it’s dependent on further exploration of Klingon culture going forward, but I’ve little doubt that Discovery is willing to engage on that front.

Here’s my review of Star Trek: Discovery’s second episode, Battle at the Binary Stars – please give it a read!

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