Caroline Dhavernas on Easy Living, indie films, and more

caroline dhavernas easy living adam keleman hd jen richards

It’s funny, because we often talk about ‘Will the character be likable?’ – I don’t think it’s important for a character to be likable. I think people want the drive, actually, to see someone who’s behaving in a way that they cannot allow themselves to behave, as an audience. I think that’s where we throw all of our – it’s like a bit of a fantasy sometimes, to see a character be rude, be bold, to not have to be polite, it’s so fun, I think we kind of fantasise about being allowed to be that way, sometimes.

My interview with Caroline Dhavernas! I don’t think I got this one quite right; there’s a moment early on where she asked me a counter question, which threw me a little because I wasn’t expecting it, and I think because she wasn’t super impressed with my answer she switched off a little bit. Although I might have imagined that, to be honest.

Facebook | Twitter | Blog Index | Interviews Index

Bernard Zeiger and Casey Stein, the team behind Otis, on interactive drama, new modes of storytelling and more

otis bernard zeiger casey stein interview crime drama interactive choose your own adventure three perspectives infinite possibilities

Our development on this short began about four years ago when we stumbled on an article about a boxer in the American Rust Belt whose life turned to crime and eventually caught up with him. We decided to try to write his story as a feature-length film. When we finished it, we hated it. There were so many people playing crucial roles in the way this man’s life turned out who were not getting the attention they needed to tell the full story. After struggling with it for a while, we decided we wanted to get a more holistic view of the events by telling the experiences of multiple characters – all at once.

Recently did an interview with the team behind an interesting new project!

Facebook | Twitter | Blog Index | Interviews Index

Everything you need to know about The Child in Time

the child in time benedict cumberbatch sunnymarch ian mcewan hd

The Child in Time is a 90-minute adaptation of Ian McEwan’s 1987 novel of the same name; it’s the story of children’s author Stephen and his wife Julie coping with their grief after their young daughter is abducted. Benedict Cumberbatch put it best, describing the original novel as ‘profound, beautiful and very moving’, talking about grief with ‘telling honesty’.

I’m not quite sure this was any good, exactly; often the most interesting aspects weren’t quite given enough space and focus, and the less interesting elements were borne of (as far as I understood) an overdependence on the book, despite at the same time attempting to break away from it.

Facebook | Twitter | Blog Index | General TV Index