Idris Elba’s five by five is an important introduction to new talent

idris elba bbc three five by five georgina campbell short film young talent hd kate herron

In some respects, there’s a feeling that these films aren’t exactly as groundbreaking as they seem to position themselves as; primarily, I was reminded of Channel 4’s excellent anthology series Banana, which you could argue shares the same general intent as this project, but was able to realise it much more effectively. Really, when watching five by five you wish that there had been a little more to it; each instalment feels almost like a tease, more of a pitch towards what could have been than necessarily satisfying in their own right.

And yet by the same token that feels like an entirely unfair way to categorise these short films, because at the end of the day, what they’ve achieved is manifestly more important than what they actually are. A showcase for up and coming young voices, they’re going to prove meaningful starting points for the actors and writers involved in the series – an attempt to address the paucity of diverse voices, for lack of a better word, in the production of television, if not so much in terms of telling those stories. It’s in this way that five by five makes its real steps towards exploring identity – by introducing us to these new talents.

I wrote a little bit about five by five, BBC Three’s new series of short films. I think I might write about them a little more, because I do still have some thoughts on them.

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Moon Knight can be Marvel Netflix’s answer to Legion

moon knight legion netflix marvel the defenders iron fist

Moon Knight is often criticised as being an “ersatz Batman”, which gives you some idea of the more surface level attributes of the character, but in fact it’s rather more complicated than that; a character who maintains a series of different personas (Moon Knight, Marc Spector, Steven Grant, Jake Lockley, etc) to help him fight crime, Moon Knight is a superhero with a dissociative identity disorder.

On one level, there’s scope to maintain much of what made the Marvel Netflix shows distinct in their own right, as part of the watershed moment that Daredevil once represented; Moon Knight’s mercenary past, his focus on vengeance and dealing with street crime allow for the same brutal physicality that has characterised the Netflix shows so far. And yet by the same stroke, the dissociative identity disorder inherent to the character would allow the show to play in the same sandbox as Legion, dealing with a deeper psychological drama and playing with the narrative in such a way we’ve never seen before. Indeed, a blend of these two approaches – the gritty realism and the subversive psychology – could help a prospective Moon Knight programme stand in its own right.

I wrote a post about Moon Knight, Legion, and what the next step forward is for Marvel Netflix.

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