Star Trek Review: TOS – The Enemy Within (1×05)

star trek the original series logo review gene roddenberry article analysis 50th anniversary

We have here an unusual opportunity to appraise the human mind, or to examine, in Earth terms, the roles of good and evil in a man.

Someone described this as “Jungian” on IMDb, and while I’d never claim to have the best understanding of Jung’s works, it feels like a pretty simplistic reading of his philosophies to apply them to this episode.

Because this is a quite a simplistic episode. It’s a reasonably well structured, albeit quite basic, run around of an episode; it’d be largely forgettable and essentially forgivable were it not for one fundamental flaw, which I imagine would be rather easy to guess for those who have been following my blog for a while. More on that later, though. Typically, I like to at least start these reviews with something positive, because I think it’s nice to find something positive in everything, and I do think it’s worth questioning whether or not the episode is entirely irredeemable. If nothing else, to try and find the positive will help me to figure out just what my opinion is.

It’s a step in the right direction in terms of the pacing and structure; I mentioned yesterday that Star Trek episodes have been struggling with this, but I think that The Enemy Within does a rather decent job of making sure that the episode fills its runtime reasonably effectively. Thankfully, as soon as the other Kirk is revealed, he does start getting on and doing things; this isn’t another Charlie X situation where we reveal the threat and then kinda just do nothing for half an hour. Here, at least, things are happening. You’ve even got the secondary plot with Sulu on the ground, although admittedly it’s used more to add tension to the rest of the episode as opposed to being explored in its own right. Still, though – it starts out as reasonably effective television.

captain kirk the enemy within gene roddenberry transporter accident rape culture evil double sexism misogyny janice rand grace lee whitney leo penn richard matheson tos

You can perhaps make the argument, to an extent, that it’s a good episode for the characters. To an extent it perhaps is; I think we got a much fuller view of Sulu here than we have previously, which I certainly appreciated. I’m becoming increasingly fond of Sulu, actually – quite possibly I may have a new favourite here. It’s also interesting to see Spock and McCoy’s different command styles, and their different suggestions to Kirk for dealing with the problem.

(I can’t help but feel, admittedly, there was a much easier solution to any problem – Kirk should have been confined to quarters, with Spock temporarily assuming command. Presumably there would have been medical reasons for McCoy to relieve Kirk, and it would have been a lot easier to handle the other Kirk if they didn’t both keep getting in each other’s way.)

As for the plot itself? Well, it was alright. Again, rather unsubtle, but equally, it’s one of the first episodes we’ve had that is trying to do something that comes from within the concept. This sort of transporter malfunction idea isn’t really the sort of option they’d have on a traditional naval show, and perhaps plaudits are deserved for that.

Of course, it would have been better with Spock, obviously. To separate him into the human and Vulcan sides of his character would have been a far superior episode to this one; it would have allowed for a very interesting exploration of his character, for one thing, but also I think would have prompted a more nuanced examination of those aforementioned Jungian ideas. Although having said that, it’s possible that we would have ended up with something broadly similar, so perhaps it wouldn’t have been a huge improvement.

star trek tos enemy within gene roddenberry rape culture sexism misogyny janice rand grace lee whitney leo penn richard matheson review

The episode’s main problem, you see, is the rather reductive view of good and evil put forth, as well as the fact that, because they need to link Kirk back up at the end, The Enemy Within has to argue the necessity of evil.

Which would be all well and good if the other Kirk hadn’t tried to rape Janice Rand.

There’s no other way to put that, I’m afraid, because that’s exactly what it is. It’s quite horrific, frankly; other Kirk is trying to overpower her, she’s cowering, hiding behind furniture, all of that. It becomes worse later on in the… almost the interrogation scene, I suppose, where “good” Kirk, Spock and McCoy are talking to Janice about the incident. It’s deeply uncomfortable, really; Janice is quite shaken about the event, and you end up getting some quite disturbing moments. Hell, we’ve even got a line where Janice says she “wouldn’t even have reported it”, had it not been for the other crewmember seeing it too. Shatner really misjudges one of his lines, to be honest; the moment where he says “look at me” should have been gentle and reassuring, but rather he delivers it as being more stern and commanding. Had it been any other line of Captain-ly dialogue, that may well have worked, but it’s totally unsuited for the situation here. Not only is Janice Rand nearly raped, Kirk makes it all about himself, and his own confusion around the event – she even apologises to him at the end!

(It’s far worse to see this when you remember that Grace Lee Whitney, who played Janice Rand, would later be sexually assaulted by a Star Trek executive producer; possibly, although not necessarily, Gene Roddenberry himself. There’s an even more insidious tone to it – the distinct feeling that actually, this isn’t quite fictional.)

It is, to be honest, a rather disgusting thing to have come out of Star Trek, and it feeds into a general trend I’ve noticed with Janice Rand as a character; presumably by virtue of her being a pretty blonde, she’s on the receiving end of a lot of sexism and misogyny. It was bad enough in Charlie X, but this is on quite another level – it’s treated as such a normal thing, even something for Janice to just sort of get over; at the end, after all, it’s just brushed off. Not only brushed off, it’s played for a bloody laugh – Spock makes a joke about it! Spock! Christ.

For all that we tout Star Trek as being a glimpse into a utopian future, a series that was made by a group of visionaries, it’s at times quite blatantly not. Because this is an episode that posits that it’s okay for the lead character to try and rape another character (who was, let’s not forget, at this time considered the romantic lead of the show), being made by a group of people who presumably saw no issue with what they were doing.

You know what? It doesn’t matter if this is well made, or better structured that the prior episodes. Those minor positives do not outweigh the huge negatives. This is an episode that deserves to struck off the record – not just quietly forgotten, but actively disowned.

0/10

Related:

Star Trek: The Original Series reviews

Star Trek: Discovery reviews

Facebook | Twitter | Blog Index | Star Trek Index

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s